Photo: Adeje Ayuntamiento
Photo: Adeje Ayuntamiento
Photo: Adeje Ayuntamiento

Adeje Ayuntamiento has unveiled a 5* project for El Puertito, on the coast below Armeñime. The council says that the plan will fully respect the natural value and environment of the area, protect the residential zone and underwater reserve, but will create up to 1,000 jobs while bringing 21st century tourism to this part of the borough.

Mayor Fraga announced that only 31% of the land in the area may be used for building (with some 50% in total in the public domain) and that plans will protect the environment and local residents: the project will integrate their houses into the plan and, where possible, follow the lines of the house designs in the port which is part of the natural value and charm of the area. The mayor said that one of the non-negotiable conditions with the developers of this new project has been that the small hamlet of around 30 residents is protected. Another precondition was the strengthening of the marine reserve, an environmental marine project that has been developed since 2011.

The project envisages an extension of the beach area, the creation of natural spaces with a wooden pathway, lakes, stepped pools, green zones and gardens as well as a road design that will be as unobtrusive as possible. The images above give a reasonable artist’s impression of the finished design. The initial investment is currently estimated at €25 million with employment for 250 persons over the next 2 to 3 years. In the long term the developers, Filip Hoste (responsible for projects such as Baobab Suites), say they will create 750 jobs with an overall investment of €180 million over 5 years. During this time the plan is to build leisure, commercial and beach zones, as well as the construction of 5-star accommodation. When the project is concluded it is estimated that 1,000 new jobs in the tourism sector will have been created.

The new plan will also include new high tension pylons, water sanitation installations and much improved telecommunication networks, as well as new access routes to the zone following the coast, and the creation of parking spaces. The developers have also designed a 5 kilometre pathway and a 4 kilometre bicycle lane circling the zone.

 

This article has 20 Comments

  1. Thats great news, lets hope that the people in the restaurant down there learn how to treat their customers. I have taken several friends down there for lunch on different occasions and they were very rude.

  2. Wait till the developers get hold of the project it will look nothing like this!!!. I wonder if they have costed in any life guards for the visitors?

  3. I don’t think it’s good news, in fact I think it will be an awful development and it’s not going to do the turtles any good when all the effluent from the development hits the ocean. I would rather have a rude bar owner and an undeveloped little hamlet and beach than a monsterous 5 star eyesore. Adeje are heading for the situation where all their coastline is concreted over like Arona.

  4. Another all inclusive to leach monies from the pockets of small local businesses and straight into the hotel chains / council. If the various councils of the south put as much effort/pressure to ensure the completition of the south hospital as they did into hotel building then we would all be better off. Im sure someone’s cousin’s brother in laws husband must be developer. That’s how the council normally works here.

  5. This is one of the places I like to visit because as yet its not over developed nice and quiet so now another place possibly ruined.

  6. I just wish that the law could be changed so that all the unfinished eyesores had to be completed before any new touristic building took place.

    There should be a law that states that when a site has not been touched for more than say 10 years, the government can claim it back and then sell off to the highest bidder to complete the development, or demolish it and clear the site before being given permission to start a new build somewhere else.

    A brand new build is yet another potential eyesore in the making. What on earth do the canarian people feel about what tourism has done to the island, when the place is littered with half built building sites?

  7. Oh No. I think this will spoil an area of natural beauty. I go there because it is not developed, but is a lovely hamlet that is peaceful and quiet. Even if they retain the hamlet it will get overrun with tourists.

  8. Folks
    I would not worry too much about this development happening. Think about Los Tarajales along at Cristianos. Its like a war zone and has been under promise of development since before 2008. It was then decided that 2014 would be the year to start things moving, clean the area up, make it a 5 star beach development with the money already allocated. Surprise surprise not a stone has yet been turned or ever will. El Puertito will still look the same in 20 years, guaranteed.

  9. The developer is the one who did the 5* Baobab complex in El Duque. Many people thought that that wouldn’t happen in the foreseeable future, too …

  10. I totally agree with Stewart Kirby and his excellent observations. (I think many of us we have experienced the bar owner’s harsh words if you do not order his dish of the day, but to me this simply adds to the charm of the area). What an experience it is to walk through this tiny village and along the small winding pathway which leads onto spectacular views of the natural coastline that millions of years have produced. El Puertito was a real find when we came across it over 30 years ago and has changed little since then. Where are the restraints to preserve important areas of Tenerife that are not up thousands of feet up the mountains?

  11. This is nuts as there are so many vacant and underused properties in the adjacent resorts not to mention the various ” war zone ” feature empty shells of un completed blocks. Spain at its best?

  12. Interesting to see an article in the Island Connections today concerning the Russian tourist market. Tenerife expects to see a drop in Russian visitors of 3.5 % this year but more interesting is the fact that there is a 20% fall in Russians staying in 5 star hotels suggesting that they are looking for more economical accommodation. Is this a sign that 5 star tourism is not the way forward after all?

  13. I think it’s more a sign that Russia specifically is suffering hugely under its own economic troubles, caused by drops in global gas and oil prices, and not least western sanctions on Putin for his “intervention” in the Crimea.

  14. The rouble has devalued by close to 50% against the euro in the last year, most of that drop happening since October.

  15. The Russians were viewed as saviours of tourism and property purchase and now that bubble has burst. I think it will be interesting to see the impact that the loss of this business will have.

  16. It’s this potential problem with reliance on a single economy that is behind the Canarian tourism authorities’ 5* push throughout Europe. Yes the Russians were indeed seen as a major market, but not the only one. Turismo has been pushing 5* upmarket tourism in Scandinavia and the “eastern bloc”, as we used to call it, as well as central Europe. As Doreen’s post indicates, Russia’s had a problem over the last year, but tourism figures here keep soaring. Finland and the Baltic states seem to be taking up a lot of the slack. I think the Russians were primarily seen as saviours of the property market rather than tourism as such, and that particular angle might need to be revisited now …

  17. comme le dit l’article, le projet prévoit une extension de la zone de plage, la création d’espaces naturels et hébergement de luxe – mais nous ne savons pas quel type – pour les touristes, mais la protection des habitations existantes.

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