Photo: Adeje Ayuntamiento
Photo: Adeje Ayuntamiento

Update 4 May 2015: Well they said Spring … and though it’s a year later than planned, the Barranco del Infiero is to reopen to the public this Wednesday. There’s no official announcement, but the council has unofficially confirmed rumours of the opening, as well as that it has awarded a management contract for maintenance to keep the path safe – as posted below, a walker has died on this route from loose rocks. This will inevitably mean charges, and at present, it seems that walkers will pay €12, with Tenerife residents paying half that price, and those on Adeje’s padron just €1. Numbers will be limited to around 300 a day to avoid deterioriation of the path through overuse.

Update 29 July 2014: Despite promises that the barranco would reopen this summer, it is now apparent that it won’t even be open again to the public this year. The conservation, management, signage and control of visitors of the 1,843 hectare protected natural space is organized by Adeje Ayuntamiento under a joint 20-year agreement with the Cabildo, signed last year, and it is the Cabildo’s environment department which is drawing up a viability study that could see the barranco reopen safe from rockfalls, and with the partly-ruined path repaired after being washed away during last December’s rains.

But it won’t be this year. Meanwhile, posters and signs are ignored by ramblers, as is the fence that was put up to stop people going in in defiance of the signs. No doubt because of expected forthcoming summer activities, council and Cabildo alike say that the barranco is closed because someone died there, a German hiker in 2009, and that entry into any officially-closed space is one of the criteria used when decisions are made to impose charges for official rescue operations.

Update 4 March: Just a month or so away from opening now, but people still treat it as though it were open already. In Tenerife, when the authorities say something is closed, they mean “officially” closed. In the UK, it appears, we’re used to things being made inaccessible when they’re closed, roped off, made impossible for us to hurt ourselves. It’s a cultural difference that might cost someone dearly because an emergency rescue is currently underway this afternoon to help walkers who have got into difficulties in the barranco. Charges are now made for such rescues if those needing rescue have been reckless, or ignored official warnings and signs. In this instance, at least three official rescue teams were involved.

Original post 2 January: The barranco del Infierno has been closed, officially anyway, to walkers since 2009 when a walker died in a rockfall. Since then, questions and rumours about when, or even whether, it would reopen have been plentiful. Now, however, Adeje Ayuntamiento has finally approved the administrative contract for the service of information and public use of the hiking trail; it was published yesterday in the Boletín Oficial de Canarias. Concejal de Obras y Servicios, Gonzalo Delgado, said that barring unforeseen problems the barranco should be reopened in three months. For conservation and security reasons, a limit of 300 walkers per day will be imposed.


This article has 2 Comments

  1. The law authorizes you she(it) to make different prices(prizes) on a case-by-case basis for the same service ? ” Price(prize) tourist ” is a synonymic expression of flight(theft). It is very hurtful this behavior.
    Sorry for automatic translate.
    La loi autorise t’elle de faire des prix différents à la tête du client pour un même service ? “Prix touriste” est une expression synonyme de vol. C’est très vexant ce comportement.

  2. It’s a great walk but only suitable for the fit. You used to be able to book a time but I don’t know if that is the case now. If it rains at all they will close the barranco as it becomes dangerous. If the steep path leading up to the entrance is the same this itself becomes dangerous in the wet as it’s made of stone slabs that become very slippery. Make sure you are wearing non-slip shoes.

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