Update 11 December: Just a reminder that the Geminids meteor shower is due this weekend, on Saturday 13 and Sunday 14. Astronomers say that the last quarter moon will interfere somewhat, but that the display is one of the most prolific and reliable throughout the year, and that the meteors are particularly bright. Best time is around midnight, but watch from around 9pm and throughout the night

Update 16 November: Just a reminder of the Leonids, best between midnight and dawn. There’s a waning crescent moon, but it shouldn’t interfere too much. Peak is tomorrow night, but tonight and is the start of them.

Update 7 October: Tonight and tomorrow, particular at evening and early night, we can look out for the Draconid meteor shower. It’s never a stunner, they say, and this year there’s a full moon to boot, but in case anyone is looking at the heavens …

Update 26 July: It’s mainly going to be visible in the southern hemisphere, it seems, but the Delta Aquarid meteor shower will be visible between now and early August, peaking on Tuesday and Wednesday, 29 and 30 July. Best time to see them is apparently an hour or two before dawn, and although somewhat faint, there will at least not be a very bright moon for them to contend with, and it will have set in the early evening anyway. The Delta Aquarids will be closely followed by the bright Perseids which can be seen much nearer midnight until dawn with a peak around 10-13 August.

Update 22 May: It’s not a regular meteor shower, but astronomers are saying that we might have to add one to the list if predictions are correct. Tomorrow night is expected to be the peak night of the anticipated Camelopardalid shower, so named because the meteors will radiate from the constellation Camelopardalis in the northern hemoisphere, coming from Comet 209P/LINEAR, discovered in 2004. If the meteor shower indeed takes place, Canada and north America and Europe will get the best view, but we should still see some here in the Canaries. Best time is actually for early birds on Saturday morning, between 6 and 8am. More information on this potential new meteor shower HERE.

Update 22 April: Just a reminder that the Lyrid meteor shower should be visible tonight if cloud cover allows. Experts say that although the peak was last night, it is the thinner moon tonight that makes viewing towards the north east optimal late tonight.

Original post 2 January: The first meteor shower of 2014 will be the Quadrantids, which should be visible best between midnight on Thursday and dawn on Friday. Astronomers say that this shower might be the best of all those we can expect to see this year. The full list of this year’s meteor showers is:

  • January 3, 2014 Quadrantids
  • April 22, 2014 Lyrids
  • May 5, 2014 Eta Aquarids
  • July 29-30, 2014 Delta Aquarids
  • August 10-13, 2014 Perseids
  • October 7, 2014 Draconids
  • October 21, 2014 Orionids
  • November 4-5, 2014 South Taurids
  • November 11-12, 2014 North Taurids
  • November 17-18, 2014 Leonids
  • December 13-14, 2014 Geminids

Click HERE for full information on them all.

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