I so do not want to have to keep making these posts. Just three days ago I posted Fifth drowning in just one week in Tenerife’s waters as woman is rescued in Adeje, and now we have a sixth, and the third fatality.

This is now confirmed despite silence from official sources and other local media. Nonetheless it is confirmed that an 83-year-old woman died shortly after lunchtime yesterday in the sea at Los Cristianos.  Eye witnesses say that she was alone and her bag was found on the beach, but fellow bathers thought the poor woman was snorkelling. Although lifeguards and paramedics tried to revive her for more than half an hour, they couldn’t save her and she was declared dead at the scene.

As I’ve said all too many times before, cardiac arrest is a known symptom of cold water shock. Please read my page HERE for information on this. It is difficult to imagine at times that our waters are “cold”, but in technical terms of cold water shock, Tenerife’s seas are never not “cold”. Please take the utmost care when swimming in the sea here. I’ll keep saying it too, as people continue to drown …

 

This article has 3 Comments

  1. Not to diminish the problem, but the dictionary definition of drowning is “death by immersion in water.” There have therefore only been three drownings, not six. The other three should be positively reported as rescues.

  2. No, that’s not correct, I’m afraid. The definition now for drowning covers fatal and non-fatal types, with the classification not requiring the incident to be fatal to qualify as “drowning”. This has been the accepted terminology since the 2002 World Congress on Drowning, since which drowning is defined as “a process resulting in primary respiratory impairment from submersion in a liquid medium”. Terms like near-drowning are not used any more. Any dictionary definition that requires drowning to be fatal is simply outdated in terms of expert opinion.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *