Updated 2 March: The latest unemployment figures released today by the Ministerio de Empleo y Seguridad Social show a drop of 1,874 in the numbers of work, down 0.81% on January, leaving 229,900 out of work in the Canaries. Interannually, there are 13,732 fewer out of work than this time last year, down 5.64%. Nationally, February’s monthly unemployment fell by 9,355 (-0,2%), its second best February since 2005, leaving 3,750,876 out of work throughout Spain.

Updated 2 February: 2017 starts with a rise in unemployment, with January’s figures growing by 2,541 , a monthly rise of 1.11%. There are now 231,774 unemployed in the Canaries, according to the latest statistics released today by the Ministerio de Empleo y Seguridad Social. The growth was most marked in the western province, with Santa Cruz de Tenerife having 1,406 of the 2,541. Interannually, however, there are 14,210 fewer out of work in January this year than last, a year-on-year drop of 5.78%.

Updated 4 January 2017: The figures for the end of 2016 show that last year ended with 229,233 unemployed in the Canaries, a fall of 18,296, -7.39%, throughout the year. December’s statistics released today by the Ministerio de Empleo y Seguridad Social Solo show a fall from November of 5,541, -2.34%, but despite the downward trend, over half of those out of work are still in receipt of no income whatsoever.

Tenerife president Carlos Alonso welcomed the drop in unemployment figures, which he said were now lower than those of 2009. They were still not good enough, he said, even though they show a clear move out of the depression of the past several years, and he hoped that things will improve even further this year.

In Spain nationally, the year ended with nearly 400,000 fewer out of work, leaving 3.7m out of work, the fourth consecutive year in which the country’s unemployment has fallen.

Updated 2 December 2016: November’s unemployment figures released today by the Ministerio de Empleo y Seguridad Social, show a rise of 1,900 in these islands, a month-on-month increase of 0.8%. The interannual trend is down, however, and there are 13,865 fewer out of work (-5.58%) compared with November 2015. Nonetheless, there are 234,774 people out of work in the Canaries after this month’s figures, over half of whom remain without any means whatsoever, a situation unchanged since February.

Updated 3 November: The latest unemployment figures released today by the Ministerio de Empleo y Seguridad Social show that the numbers out of work rose again in October, a monthly jump of 1,973 (0.85%). In interannual terms, however, unemployment is still down on last year, with 14,288 fewer out of work in the Canaries this October than last, down 5.78%. There are now 232,874 people out of work in these islands.

The monthly rise is reflected in the figures nationally, where Spain saw last month’s unemployment figures going up by 44,685, but with the rise being the lowest October jump since 2007. There are now 3,764,982 out of work in the country.

Updated 4 October: Almost certainly due to the end of temporary summer contracts in the Canaries, September’s figures released today by the Ministerio de Empleo y Seguridad Social show a rise of 716 people out of work since August, a growth of 0.31%, leaving 230,901 out of work in the islands. Interannually, figures are still down, with 11,412 (4.71%) fewer out of work this September than last.

Updated 2 September: August’s figures released today by the Ministerio de Empleo y Seguridad Social show a further fall of 1,884, down 0.81% from July. Interannually, the reduction is 12,464 personas, down 5.14% compared to August 2015. There are now 230,185 unemployed in these islands.

Updated 2 August: July’s figures released today by the Ministerio de Empleo y Seguridad Social’s show a further fall of 4,807, down 2.03% from June. Interannually, the reduction is 11,837, down 4.85% compared to July 2015. There are now 232,069 unemployed in these islands, 122,546 in the eastern province of Las Palmas and 109.523 in the western one of Santa Cruz de Tenerife. Despite the reductions, however, the long-term unemployment trends are poor, with the situation unchanged since February with regard to those out of work and without any means whatsoever: it remains at more than half, at 50.4%.

Updated 4 July: June’s figures show a fall in unemployment in the Canaries of 3,191 (-1.33%) compared to May, down in interannual terms by 11,347 (-4,57%) from June 2015. The Ministerio de Empleo y Seguridad Social’s figures show that there are now 236,876 unemployed in the Canaries, with the islands bottom of the list in recording the lowest fall nationally, where there are 3,767,054 out of work, the lowest since September 2009.

Updated 2 June: The latest unemployment figures released today by the Ministerio de Empleo y Seguridad Social show that unemployment fell by 1,996 (-0.82%) in the Canaries in May. Compared with May 2015, the drop is 11,874 (-4.71%), leaving 240,067 out of work in the islands, 114,123 in the western province of Santa Cruz de Tenerife, and 125,944 in the eastern province of Las Palmas. It’s still one of the lowest reductions throughout the Spanish regions, but it continues to come down.

Updated 4 May: April’s unemployment figures released today by the Ministerio de Empleo y Seguridad Social show a further fall, with 825 (-0.34%) fewer people out of work in the Canaries compared with March. Interannually, the fall is 11,953 (-4.71%). This month’s figures are the second worst in Spain, the Canaries being saved from bottom spot only by La Rioja. The total unemployed in these islands is now 242,063.

Updated 4 April: March’s unemployment figures released today by the Ministerio de Empleo y Seguridad Social show a fall of 744 (-0.31%) from February. Interannually, they represent a drop of 13,963 (-5.44%) compared with March 2015. There are now 242,888 people registered out of work in the Canaries, 127,651 in the eastern province of Las Palmas (Gran Canaria, Fuerteventura and Lanzarote) and 115,237 in the western province of Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Tenerife, La Gomera, La Palma and El Hierro).

Updated 2 March: February’s unemployment figures released today by the Ministerio de Empleo y Seguridad Social show a fall of 2,352 in the numbers out of work in the Canaries, a reduction of 0.96%. There are now 243,632 unemployed in these islands (115,130 in the western province of Santa Cruz de Tenerife, and 128,502 in the eastern province of Las Palmas), 15,055 fewer than a year ago, a year on year drop of 5.82%. One statistic for the Canaries that no-one will be happy with, however, is that the “nearly half of those out of work are in receipt of no income whatsoever” is now “more than half … “. After February, 125,689 of the unemployed – 51% – are without any means at all.

Original post 2 February: By any standards, unemployment in the Canaries is far too high, with around a quarter of a million unemployed in these islands at the end of 2015 (link). Moreover, nearly half of those out of work are in receipt of no income whatsoever. It’s a dire picture, but it is still falling from record highs in recent years, with month after month showing numbers dropping, however slowly.

And the trend continues with the first figures of 2016 released today by the Ministerio de Empleo y Seguridad Social, the Canaries and the Balearics being the only regions in Spain where it fell last month. The figures show a fall in unemployment here in January of 1,545 (-0.62%) from Deccember, and down 13,759 (-5.30%) compared with January 2015. There are now 245,984 out of work in the Canaries.

This article has 2 Comments

  1. As you say Janet, unemployment here, and in mainland Spain, remains unacceptably high and with many families on zero income it is totally unacceptable. But you know my views on statistics. The hidden facts do not always get to see the light of day, especially in election year.

    I recall this from El Pais last December: Rajoy legislature ends with fewer jobs than his predecessor left behind. Its here: http://elpais.com/elpais/2015/12/02/inenglish/1449059536_008945.html

    Still, at least the banks are safe now 🙂 Sorry, my sarc.

  2. It’s the summer jobs that get me … unemployment falls over the summer with temporary seasonal jobs but the contracts, and then the figures rise again once peak season’s over. This doesn’t stop political advantage being taken from the figures, though … and that wouldn’t be so bad but there’s no shamefacedness when they go back up again!!

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