Meteor showers in the Canaries in 2017: Orionid meteor shower peaks this weekend but visible from now

Meteor showers in the Canaries in 2017: Orionid meteor shower peaks this weekend but visible from now

Updated 17 October: A reminder of the the Orionid meteor shower which peaks this coming weekend but visible from now since they have a very wide window either side of optimum viewing. This shower is remnants of the tail of Halley’s comet, and can sometimes put on a show. This year, too, there’s a crescent moon so conditions are pretty good for viewing, especially after midnight. The Orionids technically radiate from the constellation Orion, but they seem to appear anywhere in the sky, so just look up!

Updated 4 October: There are two meteor showers this month, and the first is this weekend with the Draconids on Saturday and Sunday, and the Orionids over the weekend of the 20th to 22nd, but with a very wide window either side. The Draconids are rarely spectacular or plentiful, and this year there will also be a full moon, so they are best viewed at dusk, but without great expectations. The Orionids, however, offer more of a show, being the remnants of the tail of Halley’s comet. This year, too, there’s a crescent moon so conditions are pretty good for viewing, especially after midnight. The Orionids technically radiate from the constellation Orion, but they seem to appear anywhere in the sky, so just look up!

Updated 7 August: The famous Perseid meteor shower will peak this weekend, though meteors will be visible from around now and for some time after the peak. Although the Perseids actually radiate from the constellation of Perseus, they are visible all over the sky, so just look up after midnight.

Updated 25 July: This Friday and Saturday the Delta Aquarids peak though it’s not a prominent shower. Best viewing will be after midnight looking south, and this peak benefits from a crescent moon so skies will be dark.

Updated 2 May: This coming weekend the Eta Aquarids meteor shower peaks but there is a chance of seeing some a week or so either side of the peak. The shower is produced by dust particles from Halley’s comet, and although it’s better viewed from the southern hemisphere, some of the brighter meteors can still be seen after midnight, and appear anywhere in the sky even though they actually radiate from Aquarius.

Updated 18 April: The Lyrids meteor shower peaks this weekend but some meteors could be glimpsed already. It’s not a spectacular shower but it can produce some 20 meteors an hour for a week either side of the peak. The shower is produced by the dust particles from the remnants of a comet, and the meteors can leave bright long tails. There’s also not much of a moon during the peak, so viewing will be optimal. Meteors actually radiate from the Lyra constellation but can be seen anywhere in the sky.

Original post 2 January: Here is the full list of this year’s meteor showers, starting tonight with the Quadrantids. These often don’t seem to produce much of a spectacle, and particularly not for those who aren’t in the far north, but there’s a chance to see something tonight, and possibly tomorrow night too, between midnight and dawn.

January 2-3 Quadrantids
April 22-23 Lyrids
May 5-6 Eta Aquarids
July 28-29 Delta Aquarids
August 12-13 Perseids
October 7-8 Draconids
October 20-22 Orionids (very wide window either side)
November 4-5 Taurids
November 17-18 Leonids
December 13-14 Geminids
December 23-24 Ursids

There is much more information about meteor showers in general and these in particular HERE and HERE.

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